the songs you've sung on a braver day

Salutations, comrades.

This is the blog of a mobile fungus colony.

Expect for there to be a focus upon the culture, arts and history of the 20th century.

wahnwitzig:

The crew of the SMY Hohenzollern assist Kaiser Wilhelm II in hiding Easter eggs aboard the yacht. Easter, 1912.

wahnwitzig:

The crew of the SMY Hohenzollern assist Kaiser Wilhelm II in hiding Easter eggs aboard the yacht. Easter, 1912.

(via histoire-fanatique)

One moving example of the role of Jewish celebration in both the Austrian and Jewish identities of Jewish soldiers can be found in Teofil Reiss’ diary. In the spring of 1916, Reiss, then behind the lines in Hungary, serving as cook as well as medic, took it on himself to prepare a seder and kosher food for the Jews in his unit. With the Menagegeld, the army’s per diem allocation for soldiers’ food, Reiss went off to Vienna to obtain the necessary supplies, “so that Jewish soldiers should know that one can also eat kosher in the military.” He obtained matzah and wine from local Hungarian Jewish communities. At the seder itself, he asked all those assembled to rise and swear their blood to defend Kaiser and fatherland. “It was so festive,” Reiss exclaims,“that everyone present cried.”

Similarly moving is an April 9, 1917 letter from Moritz Pollack, a junior reserve officer (Zugsführer) on the Isonzo front, to his parents in Prossnitz, Moravia, describing the seder he attended. Pollack was struck by the fact that the Germans, Poles, Hungarians, Czechs, Russians, and Romanians at the seder were “all of them Jews.” The army chaplain gave a talk, first in German and then in Yiddish, while many of those present wept.The food was plentiful and good—soup with two dumplings (made from groats, since matzah was not available), meat, and prunes—and eaten in far more comfortable conditions than most of them had enjoyed for a long time. At the end of the seder they sang out “Next year in Jerusalem” with great feeling, and sang bimhero, (i.e., Adir Hu, a song about the speedy arrival of the messianic age) with a melancholy laugh. After the seder, they all sat for a long time, talking companionably together.92 The actual meaning that Jewish soldiers ascribed to the phrase “Next year in Jerusalem” varied. Many understood the phrase in its traditional messianic or modern Zionist sense, while others understood it symbolically, as an expression of their desire to be home with their children or of their longing for peace.93 In any case, Pollack and the other soldiers surely came away from the evening with an enhanced sense of Jewish solidarity.

—   Marsha Rozenblit, Reconstructing a National Identity: The Jews of Habsburg Austria During WWI, p. 95 (via fuckyeahsoftzionism)

(via lord-kitschener)

(Source: milokerrigan, via yeezymandias)

“This afternoon is glowing with the languorous warmth of the dying summer; the sun is a shield of burnished gold in a sea of turquoise; the bees are in the clover that overhangs the trench - and my superficial, beauty-loving self is condescending to be very conscious of the joy of living. It is a pity to kill people on a day like this.”

—   Roland Leighton to Vera Brittain, from France, September 1915. (via one-great-war)

(via one-great-war)

decadentiacoprofaga:

The Old Man and the Sea (Aleksandr Petrov, 1999).

decadentiacoprofaga:

The Old Man and the Sea (Aleksandr Petrov, 1999).

(Source: youtube.com)

vonstauffenberg:

A letter Colonel Stauffenberg penned to a friend (Wilhelm Buerklin) while recovering from his injuries in North Africa. Given that he had to write this one-handed with his non-dominant hand, he is forgiven for his shaky handwriting.
Note that he signs the letter with his nickname, Stauff.
(Can anyone read German?)

vonstauffenberg:

A letter Colonel Stauffenberg penned to a friend (Wilhelm Buerklin) while recovering from his injuries in North Africa. Given that he had to write this one-handed with his non-dominant hand, he is forgiven for his shaky handwriting.

Note that he signs the letter with his nickname, Stauff.

(Can anyone read German?)

mausergirl:

5sswiking:

During the Second World War, one German Luftwaffe pilot compiled a combat record so remarkable that he earned the distinction of becoming the most successful fighter pilot in the history of humanity. Erich Hartmann, called the Blond Knight of the German Luftwaffe, achieved the staggering total of 352 confirmed victories. Hartmann’s incredible combat record earned him the coveted diamonds to his Knight’s Cross from Hitler personally. He was never shot down or forced to land due to enemy fire.

He was born in 1922, making him only 17 when WW2 started.
He flew over 1,000 missions.
After the war, he spent 10 years in Russian captivity. He was released and returned to Germany in 1955.
He joined the new German air force in 1956 and resigned in 1970.
He died in 1993 at age 71.

mausergirl:

5sswiking:

During the Second World War, one German Luftwaffe pilot compiled a combat record so remarkable that he earned the distinction of becoming the most successful fighter pilot in the history of humanity. Erich Hartmann, called the Blond Knight of the German Luftwaffe, achieved the staggering total of 352 confirmed victories. Hartmann’s incredible combat record earned him the coveted diamonds to his Knight’s Cross from Hitler personally. He was never shot down or forced to land due to enemy fire.

He was born in 1922, making him only 17 when WW2 started.

He flew over 1,000 missions.

After the war, he spent 10 years in Russian captivity. He was released and returned to Germany in 1955.

He joined the new German air force in 1956 and resigned in 1970.

He died in 1993 at age 71.

(via tennyowithaluger)

polandballcomics:

Well, that explains a lot…
Source: Source and comments

polandballcomics:

Well, that explains a lot…

Source: Source and comments

(via blanksandbobbypins)

“I have often thought to myself how it would have been if, when I served in the First World War, I and some young German had killed each other simultaneously and found ourselves together a moment after death. I cannot imagine that either of us would have felt any resentment or even any embarrassment. I think we might have laughed over it.”

—   C.S. Lewis, Mere Christianity
bag-of-dirt:

Portrait of a Soviet medical orderly of the 1st Guards Cavalry Corps during the Battle of Moscow on the Eastern Front. Near Moscow, Russia, Soviet Union. January 1942.

bag-of-dirt:

Portrait of a Soviet medical orderly of the 1st Guards Cavalry Corps during the Battle of Moscow on the Eastern Front. Near Moscow, Russia, Soviet Union. January 1942.

(via bloodyapril1917)

A French member of the resistance smiles as a Nazi firing squad takes aim, 1944.
The “powder monkey” on board the USS New Hampshire in 1864. The powder monkey ran gunpowder from the powder room to the ship’s cannons and were usually boys aged 12-14, selected for their height as they could hide behind the ship’s gunwale and be protected from enemy fire.
A young Prince Charles at the coronation of Elizabeth II, 1953.
The Statue of Liberty photographed during a power failure in 1942.
British cartoon from March 1941, showing General Archibald Wavell zapping Mussolini-headed bees. This appears to be a reference to Wavell’s Western Desert Army’s rout of the Italian 10th Army at Beda Fomm, which threatened Italian North Africa with total defeat and collapse. 

British cartoon from March 1941, showing General Archibald Wavell zapping Mussolini-headed bees. This appears to be a reference to Wavell’s Western Desert Army’s rout of the Italian 10th Army at Beda Fomm, which threatened Italian North Africa with total defeat and collapse.